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I’m temporarily here again. I have great news! Alonso, my service dog, passed the Canine Good Citizen test. He received his Service Dog in Training vest, and can now go everywhere with me.

Anyway, I hate to use this blog for this purpose, but I’d really appreciate it if you could signal boost or donate to my fundraiser. I need to raise money to get Alonso a mobility harness, and it’s pretty expensive. Even a couple of dollars is a huge thing. I’m really appreciate of any support you give, in whatever way.

Here is the fundraiser.

Cheers,
Lindsay

Hey guys. I’ll get around to answering the rest of the questions in the inbox soon, likely tomorrow. We have over a dozen more, and my pain meds are starting to kick in. I may add them into a queue, but I haven’t decided yet. I don’t like adding asks to the queue, especially since people have been waiting for ages to have these answered.

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

What makes an ESA different from a regular pet? What do they do?

ESAs really don’t do much more than a regular pet does. They don’t have any special training, and they can be any kind of animal. The difference is that only disabled people can have an ESA. They’re also allowed in non-pet friendly housing and in the cabin on airplanes.

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Lindsay, what is your Facebook? I need to vent.

I’m so sorry I didn’t see this before!

This is my facebook, and anyone can add or message me any time. I’ll get back to you as soon as I can!

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

is it possible for "symptoms/signs" of autism spectrum to not be obvious until later in life? Like early to mid teens?

It doesn’t happen as often, but I don’t see why it *couldn’t* happen. It’s also possible to develop other, similar disorders such as OCD, Bipolar, and Anxiety.

A lot of Autistics, myself included, regress during times of major change, such as going away to college. Autistic signs that were suppressed or hidden reappear, and the autistic person is less capable of functioning like a neurotypical.

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Do you know if there's anyway we can get more representation for autistics in mainstream media?

Petitions? I honestly don’t know. Anybody have any good ideas?

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

I take psychology and a key issue is autism and yesterday I had to sit through 2 hours of condescending talk from my teacher and all this high functioning and mental age rubbish and talking about cures i was really angry by the end sorry, had to vent

That’s awful. Were you able to say something? I’d have been FUMING in your case.

I was really lucky. My psychology teacher works with Autistic youth, and was knowledgeable as well as understanding. She did not allow ableism, and she kept going to me for the final word on Autism, as well as asking me to explain certain aspects better. I emailed her some really good resources, and she sent them out to the whole class.

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

What are misconceptions about Autism and what should people know instead of the misconceptions?

There are too many to even count, but I’ll list the top five that I run into.

1. Myth: Autistics lack empathy and emotions.
Truth: Many Autistics are actually overly empathetic. To the point where we lose the ability to differentiate our pain from the pain of others. This causes us to shut down in order to protect ourselves, which leads to the appearance that we are apathetic.

2. Myth: Being Autistic means you’re stupid.
Truth: Statistically, Autistics tend to be of average or above average intelligence. Being nonverbal does not mean that we are unaware of our surroundings or that we are incapable of learning. It just means that we do not speak aloud.

3. Myth: Autistics are really violent!
Truth: When we have a meltdown due to overstimulation, it triggers a severe Fight vs Flight response. Some Autistics shut down and temporarily lose the ability to function. Others lash out in order to get away from the stimulation. If somebody gets in the way, the Autistic person will usually be too disoriented to realize they are hurting them in their determination to get away. If an Autistic person is having a meltdown in front of you, you need to stand back and give them room. Most of all, do not touch them. This can worsen the meltdown due to sensory processing issues.

4. Myth: Autism is an awful disease, and the real person is just hidden behind the Autism. If the Autism were to go cured, the real person would appear.
Truth: Autism is not a disease; it’s a neurological disorder. Actually, many Autistics do not believe that Autism should be classified as a disorder, as it’s just a different neural wiring. More than that, a large portion of the Autistic community do not want a “cure.” Autism is pervasive, meaning it is a part of our inherent being. Autism affects everything, from the way we think, feel, and process our environment. It is not possible to separate the Autism from the person. If you were to remove a person’s Autism, you would basically be killing them and replacing them with a stranger.

5. Myth: Autistics cannot live independently and will be a drain on their family for the rest of their lives.
Truth: Many Autistics live independently. We work, get married, have kids, volunteer, etc… We can, and do, do everything that allistic (non-autistic) are capable of. 

I found a couple great lists online, and will link them here, and here. A quick google search will also turn up some good results.

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

just wondering on the empathy thing, cus I empathise very well and I help a lot of people with emotions and shit, I just know what to say, but at the same time I stim for hours and I'm mostly nonverbal, is it possible I'm autistic still? v confused

Of course. I’m the same way, usually. I’m overly empathetic, and I know how to make my friends feel better when they’re upset. I’m very good at playing therapist, and I’m usually very aware of what’s hurting them, even when they don’t realize it themselves. 

Having empathy and an innate understanding of emotions does not mean you’re not Autistic. The two are not mutually exclusive. 

In fact, at least four of our followers have psychology as their special interest, and are freakishly good at discussing emotions.

As a whole, we tend to be overly sensitive to things. Whether it be emotions, animals, plants, clouds, airplanes, it doesn’t matter. 

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I think I might have SPD. I have two questions: 1) Am I too old to be diagnosed? Most autistic spectrum disorders are picked up really early, so if nobody has referred me to a psychiatrist by now (I'm seventeen years old) is it likely that I don't have SPD? 2) Can people with SPD stim involuntarily? The autistic people I know are fully conscious of their stimming, but most of the time I only notice when someone tells me.

1. You’re never too old! So many of us have been receiving our diagnosis as adults. I’m one of them. I was diagnosed at 19. Autism wasn’t very widely recognized when we were young. Especially in regard to FAAB persons. I’d likely have been diagnosed if I had been born a boy, or my mom wasn’t a teacher who kept my sister and I on a very strict routine. In fact, my 25 year old sister was just diagnosed with severe ADD, which she has clearly had her whole life. That routine helped us function, but it also helped hide a lot of our symptoms.

2. Absolutely. With some of my more pronounced stims, I’m conscious of them. Such as hand flapping, hitting my head, rocking, etc… Others I don’t even notice. Spinning back and forth in chairs, tapping fingers together, rocking back and forth on my feet, and the other more subtle ones.

-Lindsay

ernie-t-cat asked:

Why do people dismiss me, and the opinions I have, even though I have sources to back me up in conversations? For example, I had reliable resources as to why charter schools are not a good idea to implement, but the two people I talked with dismissed me; even though they didn't have any reliable sources. I did research, went to the Washington D.C. 'Save Our schools March', I asked my aunt, who is a Public School teacher, I read all about it, did research, yet I'M wrong... Why's that?

What do you mean by “you people?” I don’t recall speaking with you on this subject, and I can’t find a post answering your asks on our page. 

-Lindsay

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Does anyone else suppress their stimming because you've been told it's bad/stupid/ridiculous?

Absolutely. I stopped flapping my hands and rocking and hitting my head for most of my life. I created small, less noticeable stims, like tapping my fingers together. But when I found out I’m Autistic, I stopped hiding it. Now I flap my hands with the best of them, and if it’s the only that I can calm down, I hit my hand to my head. 

Stimming is good. Actually, stimming is GREAT. It’s as necessary for our mental well being as breathing is for our physical health. Without stims, I’d likely be in a near constant shut down. I know I’d be nonverbal. I can’t speak without stimming in some way. Otherwise my brain just stops working, and I can’t form words.

-Lindsay

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