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I hate autistic people who ruin it for the rest of us

kuzlalala:

autisticeagle:

There’s this godsdamn kid at my school. He’s nominally in my year, but he never EVER works, all he ever does is play computer games and make “animations”. His parents are unbelievably wealthy and extremely absent, he’s been raised by his grandmother mostly, and she always told him that he was…

Have you tried telling him what your problem is? Maybe he’ll understand.

Yup. I’ve tried, other people have tried, teachers have tried. He just doesn’t care - he should be special, because he’s a very special snowflake. When people try to tell him that maybe he should at least put the bare minimum of effort into fitting in with society, he has a temper tantrum (a literal temper tantrum, he’s 17 FFS) and says he’ll “tell his parents that [I/you/we/the school] is discriminating”. Godsdamn that kid.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Are you saying it's bad to ever explain that you do certain things because you're autistic? Because yeah, what that guy said makes no sense, but there are legitimate things that I do because I'm autistic that allistic people don't get, and I can't control them. I also don't think autistic people should be expected to act allistic. I try, but only because I know that people will be extremely ableist otherwise, and I'll be worse off socially than I already am.

No, of course not. It’s totally and completely reasonable to explain that there are some things you can genuinely can’t do or genuinely need. I do that whenever I can’t find a way around it. What ISN’T reasonable is to use your diagnosis as a way of getting what you want, as a tool for manipulation. If I KNOW that you can do something, and then you claim you can’t because you’re “autistic”, and then you do it later when it’s more convenient, that’s not a legitimate reason. That’s manipulation, plain and simple. 

I hate autistic people who ruin it for the rest of us

There’s this godsdamn kid at my school. He’s nominally in my year, but he never EVER works, all he ever does is play computer games and make “animations”. His parents are unbelievably wealthy and extremely absent, he’s been raised by his grandmother mostly, and she always told him that he was special and was very smart. The problem is, she never disciplined him either.

And then, a year or so ago, he was diagnosed with Asperger’s. And he uses it as an excuse for EVERYTHING. “I can’t tidy up, it overstimulates me”. No, it doesn’t. I’ve seen you do it before. You just don’t want to stop playing godsdamn lego Batman or something. “I talk a lot because I have Asperger’s so just accept it”. No, I can’t do that. We all have to learn to adapt to fit in, even just a little bit. I had to learn that when I want to obsess about something, I should write it in my little book rather than telling everyone. And it’s REALLY hard, but I CAN do it. He was always told he was SPECIAL though, so he thinks that rules don’t apply to him. 

And the other day, I heard some kids in my class talking about him. Nice kids, really. But he’s the only contact they’ve ever had with an autistic person who actually tells people (and he tells EVERYONE). And they were saying “well, if all autistic people are like that no wonder they’re all f***ing r-words”. 

I hate it when spoilt rich kids use “Asperger’s” as an excuse to get away with everything. I have to try so f***ing hard to fit in; I don’t let myself panic, I speak slowly, I think before doing things, I try to make sure my actions are socially acceptable. And then someone like THAT comes in and ruins it all.

Sorry about the rant. I just can’t stand people like that, who don’t even TRY to adjust to the real world. You can’t expect the world to bend over backwards to accommodate you, we all have to adapt. But this kid just thinks mummy and daddy will throw some money at the problem and it will go away, and if it doesn’t then he’s got this golden get-out-of-jail-free card for everything. The worst part is he’s probably right, but the cost to everyone else is astronomical.

— Samby

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

I think I may have had a flawless social interaction with someone I always thought of as really cool! I'd just gone to see a play and noticed my old dance instructor was there. She spotted me and gave me a hug, which I liked. We then made small talk, and I headed off after an amount of time that felt non-intrusive. She doesn't live in my town anymore, so that was awesome that I got to see her and managed to not act awkward the entire time. Or at all, even. That was great!

Awesome! Hugs are pretty nice from people you know and like, but I don’t like unexpected ones. They don’t happen much anymore though, especially after I dislocated someone’s jaw (I got into trouble for that, though it was accepted that it’s a pretty reasonable self-defence reaction).

Good to know you had a good time though ^^! It can be pretty draining, but totally worth it.

— Samby, who’s feeling more Abby right now

pinquot asked:

I recently saw a relative posting about a book by Karina Poirier, written for parents of autistic kids, called Unlocking the Social Potential in Autism. The title and description contained some vaguely troubling language but I couldn't really tell exactly what her angle was so I refrained from launching into a lecture without further info. I was wondering if any of you guys know more about this book and how okay/terrible it might be?

I haven’t read it, but I am always skeptical whenever a book about autism is written by non-autistic people, so.

Followers, have any of you read it? If so, how was it?

- Lucas

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Do any of you have problems with writing emails or electronic communication in general?

I personally am better at written communication (especially via computer or text) than I am with verbal communication. In my case, it’s because I can think faster about what I want to say when I write it, than when I verbally say it.

Although, writing formal emails (in a professional setting, for example) is something I am still uncomfortable doing.

- Lucas

Apologies for being very, very absent from AE as of late.

Between working overnight shifts full time, fracturing my L1 and L2 transverse process in my spine almost 3 weeks ago, and trying to manage my insomnia, anxiety, and depression - I’ve needed to make time for a lot of self care.

I hope everyone is doing well. I will make a better effort to contribute here more often. I also recently started volunteering for ASAN’s communication team & captioning team, so that incentive will push me to contribute to my duties here as well.

Happy Friday!

- Lucas

Parents, here’s what not to say to your disabled children

My asshole of a father recently got into a shouting match with me, stating that I was “wasting my time” when I was home sick. For the record, I’m home sick with disability flare-ups about once every 5 days, and those are the good weeks. 

No. Fuck that, you do not tell me that I should be working “non-stop, no breaks” when I’m home sick with a flare-up of a fatigue-causing disability. That is not good parenting, and in fact it’s pretty fucking shitty. 

When I have a day off from school, or from work, or something else, I’m having that day off because I am literally incapable of performing basic functions. I spent today sleeping, or lying in bed in absolute agony. I took the day off because I could no longer perform the basic tasks of keeping myself alive properly. So don’t fucking judge me when I didn’t spend the day working as though I had the fucking sniffles. 

— Samby, your resident pissed-off disabled person

Having disabilities is far too stressful

Hey guys,

So, as some of you may remember, I have severe and apparently degenerative chronic fatigue syndrome. Despite the mild name, it’s a condition that can be insanely varied; I’m one of the most severe cases, in that it’s a common occurrence for me to say “sorry school/friends/etc I can’t leave the house today, because of effective paralysis”. It also means that I often can’t stay awake, and that even slight exertion or travel can completely exhaust me.

This week, I’ve had probably the worst week in the last year. For the last 5 days I’ve been literally unable to leave the house, and after my grandparents well-meaningly but misguidedly forced me to leave the house yesterday to walk a few hundred metres, I was so exhausted that I spent the entire of today asleep. Literally the entire day. I woke up for about… 30 minutes, in order to pee and eat. Then, sleep.

This is just too stressful for words. I have the HSC to finish, which requires round-the-clock dedication and work, and I can barely concentrate for an hour a day on school work. I have a job to get to because otherwise I’ll have no money whatsoever for when I leave home, and my government is actively and directly fucking over anyone under 60.

This is not helping my autie-ness. It’s all just seriously overstimulating.

—Samby

Apparently 10% of all children have "an ASD"

karalianne:

autisticeagle:

This was on the Australian news a few days ago. I can’t remember what the context was, but they mentioned that “1 in 10 Australian children will have or have an ASD”. I think they’re confusing ASD with ADHD.

That seems just ridiculously high. I mean what…

Actually, it’s not 1 in 68 for ASDs. That’s the statistic suggested by Autism Speaks, but the actual number is probably closer to 1 in 100 to 1 in 200. 

Apparently 10% of all children have “an ASD”

This was on the Australian news a few days ago. I can’t remember what the context was, but they mentioned that “1 in 10 Australian children will have or have an ASD”. I think they’re confusing ASD with ADHD.

That seems just ridiculously high. I mean what criteria are they using here? That kind of statistic makes it seriously difficult for those of us who genuinely need help to be taken seriously. Then again, I’m pretty sure it was on “A Current Affair”, which for non-Australians is basically the TV’s tabloids.

— Samby

Stuff I’ve been up to since I slightly-kinda abandoned this place

School: almost finished with my last year of high school. I had to repeat a year because my physical disabilities made it literally impossible to attend enough classes to qualify for the exams that year. I extended my penultimate year across 2 years instead to make up for it.

Work: I actually have a job now! Woohoo! I’m a childminder, which is to say rather than a babysitter I’m an actual, accredited nanny. 

That’s kind of it. I’ve mostly been trying to finish school. Got 6 weeks till school ends, and then another 3 weeks until exams. Should be done by November! Yay!

— Samby

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